Thursday, May 28, 2020

Dementia in the Family?

Both of my parents suffered from Senile Dementia in their later years. Mum who lived until she was 94 knew me to the end and sometimes recognised my husband. She knew that our descendants belonged but she was unable to identify any of them.

Last week in another Facebook Group a genealogist, Robert, posted a copy of a document he had created for a family member who is affected by dementia. As I thought this was too good a resource to be shared just in a small group I asked Robert for permission to share it here.

In the following image are instructions for Robert's Visual Family Tree which you may find useful if you have a family member suffering from Dementia. To protect the privacy of living individuals Robert has blurred images. I have copied Robert's instructions at the bottom of this post in case you have trouble enlarging the image.

Thank you Robert for your genearosity.

The Visual Family Tree

Here’s something you can make if you have a family member in a care facility. It’s a Visual Family Tree and it serves four purposes:

 It places the Elder person(s) proudly at the top, with their subsequent generations cascading
underneath
 It has everyone’s names, as a memory jogger
 It shows birthdates and wedding dates, as a reminder
 Importantly, if displayed in their room, it provides a safe place where a visitor or staff can
interact with the Elder(s).

A large sheet of cardboard, photos, glue stick and neat handwriting is all you need, and get it
laminated because people will touch it. If you have Photoshop skills, then make it that way. Good luck!

Tuesday, May 26, 2020

Trove Tuesday - Aunty Mary


My Aunty Mary would have been ninety-seven yesterday. I have many fond memories of Mary Aileen Curry (1923-2014) but one of my favourites is when I was flower girl at her wedding to Edward Corbett in 1957. I was so honoured to be part of this occasion and took this role seriously but, as the event did not make the local press, I have to rely on my memories and photographs.

Jill and Mary, April 1957

Trove has given me a few insights into Aunty Mary's earlier life.

1926 'Spencer.', The Gosford Times and Wyong District Advocate (NSW : 1906 - 1954), 18 February, p. 3. , viewed 26 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article161110901

This short snip reports on the first major challenge young Mary faced. She just took this disability in her stride and forged ahead with a happy and successful life.


1937 'DIOCESE OF BATHURST', National Advocate (Bathurst, NSW : 1889 - 1954), 28 January, p. 4. , viewed 26 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article160351086

The Currys were a Catholic family, until I found this snip, I thought that the name of the school that Mary and her siblings attended was different from the one cited in this article. I was obviously getting confused with the name of their Parish Church. The results above are for religious knowledge exams in the Diocese of Bathurst.

1938 'DIOCESE OF BATHURST', National Advocate (Bathurst, NSW : 1889 - 1954), 19 January, p. 6. , viewed 26 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article160703622
.

Twelve months later the tables had turned with Uncle Tom scoring 81 in the religious knowledge exams. I know that Aunty Mary left school after her third year of secondary education. I wonder where she worked between then and 1942. There is mention in Trove of a Nurse M. Curry at Canowindra in 1939, perhaps that was Mary.

1942 'About People', The Forbes Advocate (NSW : 1911 - 1954), 13 October, p. 2. , viewed 26 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article219510430

Mary used to talk about working in Forbes but I didn't know when this started and for whom she worked.

1942 'About People', The Forbes Advocate (NSW : 1911 - 1954), 24 December, p. 2. , viewed 26 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article219516509



1945 'About People', The Forbes Advocate (NSW : 1911 - 1954), 5 January, p. 2. , viewed 26 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218691812

I remember this story as Aunty Mary told me that my Dad sent her money to hep buy replacement clothing which may have been hard to come by in the war years. 

1945 'Advertising', The Forbes Advocate (NSW : 1911 - 1954), 5 January, p. 5. , viewed 26 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218691823

So Mary was working with Goldsborough Mort before she moved to Sydney.

1945 'About People', The Forbes Advocate (NSW : 1911 - 1954), 26 January, p. 4. , viewed 26 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218694258

I didn't know that Mary was a VAD volunteer during World War Two. 

1948 'About People', The Forbes Advocate (NSW : 1911 - 1954), 12 March, p. 2. , viewed 26 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218418670

With her younger sister, Kathleen, Mary moved to Sydney to work at Goldsborough Mort, this article tells me it was by 1948. As there was a post-war shortage of rental accommodation in Sydney Mary and Kath, who lived in Springfield Avenue, vacated their flat so that after I was born my parents could have a place of their own for our family. 

1948 'About People', The Forbes Advocate (NSW : 1911 - 1954), 3 February, p. 6. , viewed 26 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article218415232

 No doubt Mary enjoyed this opportunity to return to Forbes and catch up with friends.

I previously blogged about Aunty Mary here: https://geniaus.blogspot.com/2014/07/vale-aunty-mary.html

Those of us who have relatives from rural areas are fortunate that local newspapers that are digitised on Trove give us glimpses into their lives. 

Thursday, May 21, 2020

A Reference from Macarthur

Read to the end of this article and you will know why I felt like dancing.



My ancestor Patrick "Paddy" Curry has been the subject of a number of my blog posts. The last time I told Paddy's story was here in 2016.

In a recent weekly members' Hang Out with SAG  on Zoom the theme was emigration so I decided to share Paddy's interview on "The Advantages of Emigration" with Caroline Chisholm. Prior to the Hangout I set up my browser with several websites so that I could share my screen and show the interview during the hangout. 

After I reread the interview in the Sydney Morning Herald I gave some thought to the original source of the article "Douglas Jerrold's Paper" and realised that I had never followed that up.

1848 'Advertising', The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), 8 June, p. 3. , viewed 17 Mar 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12902254

After a little bit of googling I discovered an article about Jerrold on the Victorian Web. He was "a boy with minimal schooling from a lower middle-class family raised in a dockyard town in Kent goes up to London, where, after an apprenticeship as a journalist, he emerges in the 1830s as one of the country's most popular writers."

Listed on the page of Jerrold's works on the site I found that Jerrold edited "Douglas Jerrold's Weekly Newspaper, 1846-1848" and that fitted the timeframe for the original article. I popped that title into Google and, hey presto, found a link to a record in the catalogue of the National Library of Australia

NLA Catalogue Record


I was on a roll. I found my NLA Library Card and logged into their site from the link on the catalogue record which took me straight to the digitised paper in the Gale collection. I did a search for Caroline Chisholm and found three articles. One of these was the one I was seeking. In addition to the article that was published in the Sydney Morning Herald the original contained the following introduction written by Caroline Chisholm. 

Gale Document Number  
GALE|FRNYPS256237397

"I have a great respect for him, have always found him most trustworthy, honest and punctual."

Any tenant would love to hear a reference like that from his landlord! 

On reading that sentence from one of the McArthurs I was elated. This was my best geneafind of the year. Being able to share it with my genimates from SAG on the day I found it was a bonus.

Paddy was a convict but like so many fellow convicts he was a victim of his times. My great (x3) grandfather, Paddy,  was a good man

Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Trove Tuesday - Zoom Sunday

If I asked you what you think of when I mention "Zoom Sunday" I would wager that you would think it had something to do with an online meeting, webinar or catchup with friends using the Zoom platform. 

How times have changed. When I was a girl living in Randwick in 1969 "Zoom Sunday" had a different meaning - it related to an event held down the hill from Randwick at the University of NSW that was "free, fun, non habit forming" and you could bring a friend! Sounds like Zoom in 2020?  Read on.

1969 'ZOOM SOAOAY', Tharunka (Kensington, NSW : 1953 - 2010), 17 June, p. 36. , viewed 19 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article230417517



Follow this link to read the full article: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article230417517

Thursday, May 14, 2020

Down a rabbit hole with the Pusells

As I turn my research focus to my Pusell ancestors I am reminded of a story I read on Trove recently. I am not sure which William or Walter Pusell in my tree this chap was. The article reports on a visit by the Rabbit Controller to a property where Pusell was working.

1948 'MORE RABBIT CASES', National Advocate (Bathurst, NSW : 1889 - 1954), 27 November, p. 1. , viewed 14 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article161680544
 
This article is a fitting analogy for the task facing me. I currently have 424 descendants listed for the Pusell line in Australia which descends from my convict ancestor, James Pusill/Pusell who arrived in the colony on "James Pattison" in 1837.  As much of this research was done in the days before online databases were freely available some of the my records are poorly sourced.  

Like Mr W Pusell in 1948 I will be going down several rabbit holes as I chase cousins and their details. As well as updating my database in Family Historian I will be correcting articles I find on Trove and adding them to my Trove List for Pusell Deescendants. I will leave a website update until I have done a reasonable amount of  burrowing.

I wonder how many more Pusells I will find or if I will need to lop off any branches ! 

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

It's a boy!

Recently on Twitter I replied to a Trove post stating "How about genealogists correct some personal notices? #genealogy #payingitforward.

That is in the same vein as what I, as a Voluntrove, have been doing for the past hour. I entered the search term "birth son" into the newspaper zone on Trove and I have been correcting some of the entries that I find.

I'm sharing some of the good news stories with you here to demonstrate how so many geneafacts can be found from such entries. Please join me as a voluntrove and correct some personal notices.

1938 'Celebrated Birth Of Son', The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1931 - 1954), 31 January, p. 10. , viewed 11 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article247397601

1937 'Birth Of Son', The Labor Daily (Sydney, NSW : 1924 - 1938), 22 June, p. 9. , viewed 11 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article236453468

1950 'Birth of a son', The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), 4 July, p. 18. (LATE FINAL EXTRA), viewed 11 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article229620737
1952 'BIRTH OF SON EXCUSE FOR CELEBRATION', Northern Star (Lismore, NSW : 1876 - 1954), 20 August, p. 4. , viewed 11 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article96522929
1983 'BIRTH', Nota (Hawks Nest and Tea Gardens, NSW : 1970 - 1999), 1 April, p. 3. , viewed 11 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article255033719
 
1932 'Birth of a Son', The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), 10 March, p. 19. (FINAL EXTRA), viewed 11 May 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article229893533

Monday, May 11, 2020

Waiting time

Sitting at my computer waiting for a video to upload I went looking for a monument on the Monument Australia website, It didn't take me long to find what I was seeking so then I started playing around. I noticed that many of the monuments were dedicated to People  and Bing! My inbuilt Genealarm went off. Could this site be a good place to search for people?

In addition to the monuments dedicated to people and looking at a few of the descriptions on other entries I realised that many of them included names. Had I  found a new-to-me genearesource?

One of the tabs on the home page of the site is "Search", so I selected that and went to the Search Page. As many of my genimates know I am doing a surname study for the Curry surname in Australia. I simply entered the word Curry on the Keyword area and hit search.


I was rewarded with quite a few irrelevant hits as the search also returns results where Curry is part of a word so there were many mentions of  Cloncurry and Tuncurry. However hidden among this list were a few mentions of Australian Currys.

There were Currys on several honour rolls and a Memorial Tablet. I'm keen to find out more about Les Curry who is memorialised on a plaque in Bellrive, Tasmania.

Due to the limitations of the Search facility on this site if you have a common name this database will probably not be too useful for your purposes. If your ancestral names are less common you may find some surprises. It behoves us as genealogists to look under every possible rock.

Friday, May 8, 2020

GeniAus - #AtoZChallenge - Reflections

During April 2020 the month of this #AtoZChallenge I will be sharing short posts on some of the 2,000+ descendants I have identified of my 3x Great-Grandmother, Elizabeth Phipps

Elizabeth Phipps 1785-1869 was a convict who was transported from England to New South Wales in 1814 per Wanstead


Will I do it again? 

It really depends on the time I have in the weeks leading up to the challenge. This year I had plenty of time to prepare, research and even write up a few posts before the challenge commenced. This buffer enabled me to take days off during the challenge. At the moment I think that my next challenge will focus on some of the thousands of photos I have taken during my travels.

Taking part in the challenge forced me to go over research done years ago, I was able to add more to direct ancestors' stories plus discover new cousins. I realise that posts of the type I wrote aren't of particular interest to other bloggers. My purpose was not to attract readers but to put the stories in to cyberspace so that they would be available for distant cousins to find in the future. I wasn't hoping for immediate success but paving the way for future connections.

I tried to comment on a few posts from each of those geneabloggers who were participating in the challenge, this wasn't something I did on a daily basis but at times when I could spare half an hour for reading. I appreciated the comments made on my posts, it's always good to get some positive rinforcement.

Congratulations to all those who rose to the challenge and demonstrated their support for  collaboration by generously sharing family stories. We must celebrate our ancestors by telling their stories.


Thursday, April 30, 2020

GeniAus - #AtoZChallenge - Z is for Zachery and Zita

During April 2020 the month of this #AtoZChallenge I will be sharing short posts on some of the 2,000+ descendants I have identified of my 3x Great-Grandmother, Elizabeth Phipps

Elizabeth Phipps 1785-1869 was a convict who was transported from England to New South Wales in 1814 per Wanstead


Zachery and Zita are just two of Elizabeth's many descendants

Zachery is a young chap so I am not going to share any of his personal details. He is a Great-Grandson of Thorpe Egbert Price and a descendant of Elizabeth Phipps daughter, Ann Westbrook.

Zita Reynolds was born in 1923.

Zita, a committed student had a long journey to school each day. I wonder if, like my ancestors in the area, she drove a horse and sulky.

1938 'All ABOUT PEOPLE', The Burrowa News (NSW : 1874 - 1951), 7 January, p. 3. , viewed 19 Apr 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article102505903
In 1940 she enjoyed a holiday with a friend.

1940 'TOWN TALK', The Burrowa News (NSW : 1874 - 1951), 26 January, p. 2. , viewed 19 Apr 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article102361577
In 1944 she was a bridesmaid at a friend's wedding in Gilgandra, NSW.

1944 'Family Notices', Gilgandra Weekly (NSW : 1942 - 1955), 6 April, p. 2. , viewed 19 Apr 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article113241968
I hadn't been able to find much information on Zita until I realised that her name was interchangeably spelt as Zeta.  I had forgotten to examine alternate spellings!

Once I realised this I found a flood of articles about Zeta on Trove. As a child she made regular contributions to the children's pages in newspapers.

1935 'Likes Tennis, Writing and Reading.', The Australian Worker (Sydney, NSW : 1913 - 1950), 20 February, p. 20. , viewed 19 Apr 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146015004
Zeta served several times as a Bridesmaid for her sisters and friends and she was quite well known for the cakes she made for various celebrations. There is a report of Zeta's 21st Birthday party here on Trove in 1944. From Electoral rolls on Ancestry I learnt that Zeta was still living with her parents at their property, Chatswood, Gilgandra in 1954.

Zeta married Phillip George Lynch in 1957. Unfortunately I cannot find a report of the wedding as the coverage of most newspapers on Trove ceases after 1954. I would love to hear stories of Zeta's life between 1954 and her death in 2013.

I love to connect with cousins and fellow researchers. Should you find any errors in my post or have additional information please contact me. 





Wednesday, April 29, 2020

GeniAus - #AtoZChallenge - Y is for Remembering The Young Ones

During April 2020 the month of this #AtoZChallenge I will be sharing short posts on some of the 2,000+ descendants I have identified of my 3x Great-Grandmother, Elizabeth Phipps

Elizabeth Phipps 1785-1869 was a convict who was transported from England to New South Wales in 1814 per Wanstead


I haven't been able to find any of Elizabeth's descendants bore the surname Young but I have found several in the earliest generations who died at a rather young age.

Two of Elizabeth's children had short lives. Harriet Westbrook was 14 when she died and William Westbrook was only 8 years old when he died in 1829. We do not know the fate of Elizabeth's child who travelled with her to New South Wales on the Wanstead.

Several of Elizabeth's Grandchildren had short lives. Louisa Clifford lived for only four days in 1833 and her brother William Clifford for five days. Three of William John Westbrook (Magick)'s children, Susanna Rebecca Magick, Anna Harriet Magick and Hannah V died in infancy. Neither Thomas Joseph Ashton or his sibling Harriett Ashton reached the age of 1.

In the Sly family Edwin H Sly  and Ernest A Sly had very short lives. Robert H Magick died at the age of 2 in 1861, his male sibling died   1871 and George Thomas Magick was about 4 months old when he died in 1873.

Of Adelina and Thomas Hogden's offspring Robert Hogden died in 1858 before he turned 1 and Herbert Hogden was 2 when he died in 1868.

I would love to have more details of these short young lives. Should you have additional information or find any errors in my post please contact me. 

Tuesday, April 28, 2020

GeniAus - #AtoZChallenge - X is for Xerarch

During April 2020 the month of this #AtoZChallenge I will be sharing short posts on some of the 2,000+ descendants I have identified of my 3x Great-Grandmother, Elizabeth Phipps

Elizabeth Phipps 1785-1869 was a convict who was transported from England to New South Wales in 1814 per Wanstead



I haven't yet found a Xavier, Xanthe or other X named individual among Elizabeth's descendants.

Various online dictionaries tell me that Xerarch relates to living things that develop in a dry habitat. I therefore contend that Elizabeth Phipps descendants who mostly grew and flourished in the Colony of New South Wales and after the Federation in Australia are Xerachs. That's the best I can do with an X word!

During my preparations for this challenge I have looked at scores of Elizabeth's descendants. Many are ordinary folk who embraced the opportunities that arose in this new land and have lived happy and fulfilling lives, some have become famous in various fields of endeavour. They have thrived in the harsh environment that Elizabeth was transported to in the early 19th century.

I am proud to be one of our community of Xerachs. 

I love to connect with cousins and fellow researchers. Should you find any errors in my post or have additional information please contact me. 

Monday, April 27, 2020

GeniAus - #AtoZChallenge - W is for Where

During April 2020 the month of this #AtoZChallenge I will be sharing short posts on some of the 2,000+ descendants I have identified of my 3x Great-Grandmother, Elizabeth Phipps

Elizabeth Phipps 1785-1869 was a convict who was transported from England to New South Wales in 1814 per Wanstead


Where are Elizabeth's Descendants? Where have they been?

I played around with the places data in my family history program and exported a list of the places where Elizabeth's descendants have lived, worked and died. This is by no means a comprehensive list but is representative of the names in my database.

Take a look at the map I created below with the My Maps feature from Google Maps. You can move the map around and maximise and minimise any area that you wish. There are many ways you can use Google Maps to display family history data. Why not give it a go?

If you have any Phipps places to add to the map please contact me and I will do so.



I love to connect with cousins and fellow researchers. Should you find any errors in my post or have additional information please contact me. 

Saturday, April 25, 2020

GeniAus - #AtoZChallenge - V is for Valour



During April 2020 the month of this #AtoZChallenge I will be sharing short posts on some of the 2,000+ descendants I have identified of my 3x Great-Grandmother, Elizabeth Phipps
Elizabeth Phipps 1785-1869 was a convict who was transported from England to New South Wales in 1814 per Wanstead



Many of Elizabeth's descendants served in the armed services in various conflicts. On ANZAC Day the day on which we remember our ancestors who served for us, let us remember the following men and women, descendants of Elizabeth Phipps.

Collating this list has taken many hours and I know that there are more of Elizabeth's descendants who should be on this list. Please let me know of others who should be on this Roll of Honour and I will add them.



William John Barber WW1
Reginald Robert Beetson WW2
Arthur Alexander Beetson WW2
Allan Douglas Border WW2
Edward Henry Brydon WW1
James Herbert Brydon WW1 ✝
Walter Ernest Brydon WW2


Archibald Angus Cameron WW2
Ivan Raymond Cameron WW2
Bernard Arthur Cotton WW2
Mervyn Claude Davis WW2
Wallace Rowland Dixon WW2
Bernard Albert Drew WW2
Frank Duncan WW1, WW2
Clyde Henry Egan WW2 ✝


Dennis Gardiner WW2
Edward Alfred Gardiner WW2
Kenneth William Gardiner WW2
Leonard John Gardiner WW2
Albert Henry Hogden WW2
Charles Edward Hogden WW1
Neil McKensey Hogden WW2
William George Hamilton Ireland WW2
Robert Jack Key WW2 ✝

Lawrence Albert Konza WW2
Arthur Richard Libbesson WW2


Clarence George Madgwick WW2
Clifford James Magick WW2
Donald Ray Magick WW2
Edward James Magick WW2
Henry Moore Magick WW1
James Matheson WW2


Edward Keith Paterson WW2
Harry Beauchamp Poole WW1 ✝
Eric Stanley Poole WW2
William Peter Poole WW2
Ernest Henry Powter WW2
Henry Noel Price WW2
Lionel Mitchell Price WW2
Rowland William Price WW2


John Wilson Reakes WW2
Ralph Golding Reakes WW2
Robert Frank Reakes WW2


Selwyn Sylvester Scifleet WW2
Albert William Sly WW2
Baden Keith Sly WW2
Darval Lyall Sly WW2
Frank Bernard Sly WW1
Frederick William Charles Sly WW2
Laurence Arthur Sly WW2
Raymond Harold Charles Sly
William Charles Sly WW2
Brian John Sullivan Vietnam Military Medal

Eric George Toynton WW2
Thelma Toynton WW2
William Alan Henry Vaughan WW2 ✝
Albert Edward Wahlstrom WW1
Henry James Wahlstrom WW2


For Privacy reasons I have omitted from the list the names of those who are still living.

I love to connect with cousins and fellow researchers. Should you find any errors in my post or have additional information please contact me. 

Lest We Forget


Friday, April 24, 2020

GeniAus - #AtoZChallenge - U is for Unearthed by DNA

During April 2020 the month of this #AtoZChallenge I will be sharing short posts on some of the 2,000+ descendants I have identified of my 3x Great-Grandmother, Elizabeth Phipps

Elizabeth Phipps 1785-1869 was a convict who was transported from England to New South Wales in 1814 per Wanstead



I have found most of my Phipps cousins by doing traditional research over a period of 30+ years but since I took the plunge and did my first DNA test about eight years ago (I've now done 5 with different companies) I have found more people who share Elizabeth Phipps as an ancestor.

It is gratifying when I find I have a match with someone who is already in my tree because that confirms the validity of my earlier research. When I am notified of other matches I check them out in traditional sources to see where they fit in and then add them to my tree.

Since going down the DNA path I've added several surnames to my cousin list. One of these names is Vidler. 


This fan chart shows Lillian's line back to Elizabeth Phipps.
After Lillian Jean Mahoney married Guy Hubert Stanley Vidler in 1940  a generation of three young Vidlers was added to my tree. One of those cousins was Guy Stanley Vidler (1942-2010, not yet added to my online tree ). As the other two cousins are living I will not identify them here but I must say it was pleasing to be able to correspond by email with the one who was my DNA match.

I enjoy finding and connecting with new cousins via DNA which is a most valuable source, it can be a bit awkward when we have a big match through DNA that can't be confirmed by other means as  Science doesn't lie. It just means that hanky panky was alive and well in earlier days.

I love to connect with cousins and fellow researchers. Should you find any errors in my post or have additional information please contact me. 



Wednesday, April 22, 2020

GeniAus - #AtoZChallenge - S is for Strayed

During April 2020 the month of this #AtoZChallenge I will be sharing short posts on some of the 2,000+ descendants I have identified of my 3x Great-Grandmother, Elizabeth Phipps

Elizabeth Phipps 1785-1869 was a convict who was transported from England to New South Wales in 1814 per Wanstead


The Truth (Sydney, NSW : 1894 - 1954) was a tabloid newspaper and scandal sheet. When reporting on scandalous doings it sometimes reported on them in a humourous manner. Such was the case with the following story that featured Clarence Victor Magick.


If you are likely to be offended by this salacious story please do not read on. 

1926 'HERBIE HAD A LITTLE LAMB', Truth (Sydney, NSW : 1894 - 1954), 22 August, p. 17. , viewed 28 Mar 2020, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article168727593

Truth (Sydney, NSW : 1894 - 1954), Sunday 22 August 1926, page 17

Full text of the above article follows

HERBIE HAD A LITTLE LAMB
But the Magic Love of Magick Enticed It Right Away

THIS is a story of a game of love as it was played out where the horizon never ends, and where the bleat of the Springtime lamb, and the purr of the growing mint are lost in the cries of the crow Read on, and you will find how - Herbie had a little lamb — How it gambolled far away—

How Herbie fired the little lamb In Divorce the other day. It all came about because there was a weak woman, who was "lonely"; a hubby who was in love with his work, and that far from home; a neighbour, who could 'tell a tale,' and whose motto apparently was:

"Here's to love and unity, Dark, corners, and opportunity." 

The ingredients were: Herbert William Garbutt, a "Digger" and station hand of the second generation; his wife, Edith Fenson Garbutt, a Northamptonshire lass; and Clarence Victor Magick, also a station hand, with an idea that perhaps one day he might take Valentino's job as sheik.

With the three mixed together and stirred well for a long period, and the hubby skimmed off, the result was all that might have been expected.

Of course, it was a fine mixture, and baked in the Oven of Life, It ended with hubby taking a ticket for the Divorce Court, and getting a solicitor to introduce him to Mr. Justice Owen and a jury of twelve.

The prize, of course, was a divorce, with £300 extra prize-money added. Hubby asked for £500, but the twelve men gave him only £300.

Herbert is a back country man, one versed in the lore of the jum buck, a man who has spent the larger part of his 31 years 'out in the open spaces, whose fences are the stars'; mustering, droving, shearing, dagging, lamb-marking — living among sheep, eating them, dreaming of them. All these various things he did, and did well. He conquered them all.

Paddocked 

And then In a fit of abstraction, he tackled a wife, an entirely new problem —and she beat him. It was in the year 1918, and In a freezing July when the westerlies shriek across the plains that the Merrigal man felt the cold that he warmed up to the Idea of matrimony.

He began mustering the ewe lambs he knew, but there wasn't one of Aussie stock that satisfied his expert eye as a classer. Then in Sydney he discovered an English lamb, which he judged to be a pure merino. With the aid of a sky pilot, the bushman yarded and branded her with his own name In the Church of England at St. Peter's.

Originally she was Edith Fenson Wood.

After his successful muster, and the culling of his own especial pet lamb, Herb ventured to Armatree, near Dubbo, where he paddocked the lamb, seeking work at a station about eight miles from the township. Among his few acquaintances Herb had a pal named Clarrle Magick. They had often split a 'johnny cake.' and a billy of tea together, and slept under the same blanket. Herb had great faith in Clarrle, as he called him.

Clarrie was working on a station about two miles from Armatree, some six miles nearer Garbutt's lamb than her real shepherd.

Clarrie used to call around and see that the lamb was safe, while the shepherd was away from home, and this consideration for her forlorn lot made a deep impression on her.

Two little lambkins were added to the flock while Herb worked near Armatree, and everything was Christmas. 'Up to the time she met Clarrie she was a good woman.' said Herb mournfully to his Honor. 'She was a good housekeeper, and good to the children. We all lived happily together."

Some time after this Herb moved to Corvan, a considerable distance away from his home paddock, and the false shepherd, Clarrie, continued to ride boundary about the Garbutt homestead.

Soon Herb began to notice little endearments passing between Clarrie and his little lamb. So he pulled the wool out of his eyes, and dropped a warning to her.

'I think you are a bit too familiar In your relations with Clarrie,' he ventured to say.

'Oh, Herb,' she bleated. 'Clarrle Is all right; there's no harm in him.'

Mr. E. Abigail: So you let it sleep?— Well, yairs; I thought it was all right.

Later on Herb's little English lamb suggesled that a holiday to the Big Smoke would buck her up a bit, and Herb good-naturedly agreed, and handed her £10 for the trip.

On September 2, 1925, she climbed into a train, and went to the city.

Herb bade farewell to her, and she was effusively affectionate at parting, more affectionate than the fabled 'Mary's little Iamb' of our schooldays.

It was merely a coincidence that two days before the lamb's departure, Clarrie also pointed his nose citywards. He came to Herb and told that simple bush man that he was going down to the city for a few days, and then he Intended to make for Queensland, where he hoped to secure a selection through the Repat

'I have about £600.' said Clarrie. 'and I'll get a block of land.' 'I bade him good-bye,' said Herb, 'and away he went.'

When the wife went away, she left the two little lambkins with Herb. Her holiday ran into two months, and Herb was getting anxious about her.

Then she wrote to say that she would not come back to Corven any more, and she added: 'I won't write to you anymore.'

The Show Down

Unfortunately Herb had destroyed the letter. Her complaint was that the country was 'too quiet.' She loved the bright Iights. and the surge and swing of the hustling crowds.

Came an interegnum (sic) but soon after the lamb's mother wrote a letter to Herb. That epistle galvanised him into activity. He went to Sydney as fast as the rattler would carry him. Here he picked up some information about his lost sheep, and hastened to get on her tracks.

Accompanied by a Mr. Sorley and James Morrison, a law clerk from Mr. Ernie Abigail's office, he went to a house in Green St, Tempe. Arrived at the doorstep, they knock ed, and a voice, which Herb re-cognised as that of his stray lamb, bleated something.

Then she came to the door. She was asked if she was Mrs. Magick. She said she was, and Mr. Sorley asked If they could come inside.

This was agreed to, and they entered the dining room. She was asked if they could see Mr. Magick, and in answer to a call, the false shepherd, Clarrle, came into the room. He was coatless, hatless, and bootless, and appeared to have been cleaning up the kitchen for 'Herbie's little lamb.'

'Is this your husband?' asked Sorley, pointing to Clarrie, who looked as if he wished he had gone to Queensland after that block of land.

'Yes,' said the lost sheep. 'Do you know this man here?' asked Sorley, pointing to Garbutt, who emerged

'Yes, he's my husband,' was the reply.

 'Are you living here as man and wife?'

 'Yes.'

'Are you ready to sign a confession to that effect?'

 Clarrie took the lamb into the bed room to discuss the matter, and when they came out they both signed a con-fession.

Flock Reduced

It read as follows: — I,Clarence Victor Magick, hereby admit that for the past five weeks I have been living with Mrs. Edith Garbutt as man and wife at Green Street, Tempe. —
 (Signed) C. MAGICK,
March 20, 1926.

Mrs. Garbutt wrote under this con-fession her own, and signed It with the same pen In the presence of her hus-band, Sorley and Morrison.

The Joint confessions were written on the one slip of common writing paper, and the scrawl showed the agitation of the sheep stealer and his victim.
There were many large and small ink blots, but no tear stains.

After a brief retirement the jury re-turned to Court with a verdict of — dam-ages £300.

His Honor found that Mrs. Garbutt had been guilty of misconduct with Magick, at Green Street, Tempe, between June 1, 1925. and March 31, 1926.

His Honor granted the delighted bushman a decree nisi, reduced his flock by one straying sheep, and gave him the custody of the two lambkins.

I love to connect with cousins and fellow researchers. Should you find any errors in my post or have additional information please contact me. 

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